Limiting Exchange 2010 SP1 Database Cache

Some time ago, I blogged about on how to limit the amount of memory Exchange 2010 can allocate for database cache. After the introduction of Exchange 2010 Service Pack 1 this didn’t seem to work anymore, as many people reported.

After some investigation, it turns out you also need to set the msExchESEparamCacheSizeMin value for Exchange 2010 SP1?s cache manager to honor the minimum and maximum limits for allocating database cache memory.

To show you this, I’ll first show Exchange 2010 SP1 where I only set msExchESEparamCacheSizeMax. In this example, I’ll use a value of 1024 which corresponds to 32 MB (1024 * 32kb pages). I then turned on Performance Monitor and started monitoring the following MSExchange Database Cache\Information Storecounters:

  • Database Cache Size, the current allocated database cache size;
  • Database Cache Size Min, the minimum database cache size;
  • Database Cache Size Max, the maximum database cache size.

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Written by

Matthew Glover
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Limiting Exchange 2010 store.exe Database Cache

Note (6apr2011): Setting the MsExchESEParamCacheSizeMax only doesn’t produce the required result as of Exchange 2010 SP1. For more information on how to limit the database cache size in Exchange 2010 SP1, see Limiting Exchange 2010 SP1 Database Cache.

I received a question from someone implementing Exchange 2010 who was surprised to see Exchange taking up all available memory. This is because in Exchange 2010 (2007 as well) memory allocation is dynamic, contrary to Exchange 2003 and earlier versions where, depending on the situation, you had to fiddle around with boot.ini switches like /3GB to make memory available to Exchange. Also, the maximum database cache size was limited in Exchange 2003 to around 1.2 GB due to virtual address space limitations (see MSKB 815372).

The main reason Exchange 2007/2010 claims memory for its database cache is performance. The more memory is assigned to the database cache, the less I/O’s are generated because things can be dealt with in-memory and the database cache becomes more effective. When a certain amount of transactions has been reached, changes will be physically written to databases (so far they’ve been stored in-memory and written to transaction logs). This limit is called the log checkpoint depth target.

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Written by

Matthew Glover
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Is Firefox losing the battle to Google Chrome?

Google Chrome vs Firefox

It’s now just over a year since Google Chrome was first released, back then it was Firefox flying the flag as the alternate browser. Since then it’s all been about Chrome, its update schedule is mighty impressive and new features are almost appearing in front of your eyes. So is it just a matter of time before Chrome starts to eat away at what Firefox has built up over time? Thanks in most part and ironically Google.

When Chrome was first released Google made it clear that it wasn’t going to be competing with Firefox, so Internet Explorer was clearly in its line of sight. Google once said that it really did believe there was room in the market for another browser, many didn’t believe it.

So with perfect timing for the browser ballot window Chrome made very quick gains, Chrome is now at the point where it can make new releases every 6 weeks. Google’s philosophy is if a feature isn’t ready for the next release, it will drop it in to the next release following that, this is allowing Chrome to be released at a much faster pace. This kind of development plan is so quick, neither Firefox nor Internet Explorer can keep pace, I think for almost entirely this reason Firefox will begin to flounder. It might not happen immediately, it might not happen for some time, but it will happen. Even the most loyal of fans will eventually become discontent with the lack of fast paced development. Continue reading

Written by

Matthew Glover
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